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How Strong is Your
Recruitment Process?

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Where do you source new candidates? Select all that apply






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It seems like your team is at the very beginning stages of leveraging technologies in the recruitment process, or there are some big process updates that you need to implement. Companies at this stage are generally experimenting with their first lightweight ATS, or building a careers page to centralize application flow. At this point, you're likely best off rallying internal support for more HR technology so you have a clear mandate to make a substantive investment. Half steps won't get you where you want to go!

You've crossed the initial hurdle: technology is clearly a part of your recruiting process. Reaching this point is a great start, but it's also a critical time to develop a roadmap for future evolution. What are the true needs of your recruiting team? Are you crippled by low application volume? Or are your recruiters overwhelmed by too many phone screens? Taking an objective view of the factors limiting your productivity will provide a clear path forward.

You've made strong progress towards building an effective recruiting framework. Consider optimizing key metrics, and ensuring the brunt of your budget doesn't get sucked into attracting resumes you don't have the resources to screen.

Congratulations! Your team seems to be at the forefront of leveraging the best technology out there. At this point, you're likely best off dropping some tools you're no longer using (there are usually some legacy services that stick around longer than they need to) and leveraging internal resources to design a process that's airtight.

  • It seems like your team is at the very beginning stages of leveraging technologies in the recruitment process, or alternatively, there are some big process updates that you need to implement. Companies at this stage are generally experimenting with their first light-weight ATS or building a careers page to centralize application flow. At this point, you're likely best off rallying internal support for more HR technology so that you have a clear mandate to make a substantive investment, half-steps likely won't get you where you want to go!

    You've crossed the initial hurdle and technological enablement is clearly a piece of your recruiting process. Reaching this point is a great start, but it's also a critical time where you develop a roadmap for future evolution. Where do the true needs of your recruiting team lie? Are you hamstrung by low application volume, or are your recruiters overwhelmed by too many phone screens? Taking an objective view of the factors limiting your productivity will provide a definite path forward.

    You've made strong progress towards building an effective recruiting framework, you should consider optimizing key metrics like time-to-fill and ensuring that the brunt of your recruiting budget doesn't get sucked into attracting resumes that you don't have the resources to screen effectively.

    Your team seems to be at the forefront of leveraging the best technology out there, congratulations! At this point, you're likely best off dropping some tools you're no longer using (there are usually some legacy services that stick around longer than they need to) and leveraging whatever internal resources you can muster to design a process that's airtight.

  • It seems like your recruiting team is pretty far from where you'd like it to be. You know best, but we usually find that this manifests itself in many versions of the same theme; a recruiting organization that is the under-resourced relative to the needs of the business. At this point, you're likely best off presenting this state of affairs in as cogent a way as possible to your COO or VP of Human Resources, as your team won't get very far if it's too far down the resource allocation heirarchy.

    You've built a team that specializes in recruiting and you've likely got a hiring process in place, but there is a lot of work that remains to be done for you to be a world-class recruiting organization. Companies at this stage usually choose to go down one of two paths. They either train their recruiters to be more efficient or buy technology to enable them to be more productive.

    It seems like your team has the basics down pretty well. In order to get to the next step you should focus on maximizing the number of roles that your team is able to recruit for. Many teams at this stage handle the junior roles but don't have the in-house expertise to hire developers or executives. Don't let your team become relegated to the high-volume roles, you should develop your recruiters in order to make your team the go-to resource for all positions so that you aren't dependent on a staffing agency or RPO.

    You're doing great! Your company trusts you to recruit for a wide variety of roles, most of your hires come from your in-house team, and you're responsible for a large number of hires each year. Companies that reach this level of recruiting excellence need to make tweaks versus wholesale changes, we'd love to chat about what would make the most sense for you.

  • We won't sugarcoat it, you're facing some major challenges when it comes to screening candidates. You most likely need to rally some internal momentum in order to develop a rudimentary screening process. Remember, there is a REALLY GOOD reason to screen candidates, it saves everyone on your team a lot of time in the recruiting process if you make an upfront investment to screen candidates, think of it as insurance so hiring managers don't have to speak with someone who is obviously a poor fit.

    You clearly screen candidates as part of the interview process, but there's a lot of room for improvement. Some quick recommendation would be to ensure that hiring managers are NOT the ones screening candidates, that you're not spending 15-minutes or less on a phone screen, and that you're screening more than a token percentage of your applicant pool.

    At this point you've developed a functional process and you've likely run out of "easy fixes" to make. Do you have the team in place to make the more difficult changes? You'll be able to make a material change if you're able to invest in screening technology or find ways to dedicate more resources to a more comprehensive screening process. If your recruiting team's mandate is to screen and get qualified candidates in front of hiring managers and not much else, you're on the right track.

    Your team is doing a strong job of screening candidates, nice work! At this point, you will most likely be able to make the biggest improvements by making your screening process more rigorous so that hiring managers hire an even greater percentage of those candidates that reach the on-site interview stage. This can be done by screening more candidates, developing performance profiles, and crafting a consensus for what applicant performs best in a given role.

  • Your team is struggling to provide a positive candidate experience. Before you get too down abou this, it's definitely the hardest part of the recruiting process to get right, and you're definitely not alone, and besides, you can only get better from here! If you're at this point, you need to commit to making the experience of candidates who apply to your company a top priority. Half-measures won't work here, so if you're struggling in this area you're best off generating momentum to make substantive changes versus enacting a couple superficial changes.

    At this stage you're engaging and communicating with those candidates that make it to a late stage in your interview process, but there is plenty of room to do more with the tools available to you. Step one would be doing an audit of where you do well and where you do poorly. How many hires turn over within a year? What percentage of candidates receive any communication from you, and at what stage in the interview process?

    Teams like yours are generally able to make the biggest improvements by being more transparent with their candidates. You're doing well, but you do need to make sure you're not leaving anyone in the dark and candidates know where they stand in your process at all times.

    If you've reached this level, you're killing it! Getting the candidate experience right is very difficult, and few companies do as well as you seem to be. When you reach this level of achievement, you can and should be focusing on developing a brand that candidates will recognize and flock to for years to come.

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